Islam’s Seven Heavens Derived From Mesopotamian/Sumerian Myth?

In the name of God, the all-Compassionate, the all-Merciful

Ancient Mesopotamians/Sumerians believed in seven heavens and seven earths, the first heaven being home to all the stars. Islam also teaches seven heavens, the first being the solar system. Hence, critics infer, the seven heavens are ultimately of mythic origin.

My own theory, however, is that the seven heavens/earths (as well as the Big Bang and the seven gates of Hell (Qur’an 15:44) for that matter) were part of the Ilm al-Ghayb (Knowledge of the Unseen) Allah revealed to Prophet Noah PBUH. This knowledge was then inherited by the generations that followed him, and they became embedded/embellished in the myths of subsequent pagan cultures.

They could have also been revealed to other prophets who were sent following the (local) Flood that wiped out humanity except Noah and his family, every nation on earth having received a messenger at some point in history (Qur’an 16:36).

And Allah knows best.

No. of Surahs in the Mushaf of Ibn Masud — WE DEFEND ISLAM

Source: http://icraa.org/surahs-mushaf-ibn-masud/#_ftn14 ======================================================= Waqar Akbar Cheema Abstract One of the arguments used by Orientalist and Missionary critics of Islam to cast aspersions on Qur’anic preservation is related to the fact that the beloved companion of the Prophet Ibn Mas‘ood chose not to write three of the 114 surahs in his copy of the Qur’an. In […]

No. of Surahs in the Mushaf of Ibn Masud — WE DEFEND ISLAM

How the European Colonialists Conspired to Destroy the [real] Caliphate System

Islam Reigns

On Monday 3rd March 1924 (28th Rajab 1342AH), the world woke to the news that Mustafa Kemal in Turkey had officially abolished the Khilafah. That night Abdul-Mejid II, the last Khalifah of the Muslims, was bundled in to a car with a suitcase of clothes and money and exiled from Turkey, never to return. This is how 1342 years of Islamic rule ended. The following is a historical account of the actions of the colonial powers in first sowing the seeds of disunity amongst Muslims by implanting the idea of nationalism and then finally administering the destruction of the Khilafah state by their treacherous agents.

Turkey’s independence was officially recognised with the implementation of the Lausanne Treaty signed the year before on 24 July 1923. Britain and its allies withdrew all their troops that had occupied Turkey since the end of the First World War. In response to this, protests…

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How the Book of Isaiah is Evidence of Islam

المطر الأخير

A lot of thanks to https://www.manyprophetsonemessage.com/ for providing a lot of information on this topic. [1]

The Qur’an says that Prophet Muhammad (peace and blessings from Allah be upon him) is mentioned in older religious scriptures. These religious scriptures came many hundreds and thousands of years before he was born. This is evidence that Prophet Muhammad (peace and blessings from Allah be upon him) is a true Prophet. The Qur’an says:

Those who follow the Messenger, the illiterate Prophet (Muhammad), whom they find written in what they have of the Torah and the Gospel, who enjoins upon them what is right and forbids them what is wrong, makes lawful for them what is pure and prohibits for them the evil, and relieves them of their burden and shackles that were upon them. Those who have believed in him, honored him, supported him, and followed the light (revelation) that was…

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Introduce Yourself (Example Post)

This is an example post, originally published as part of Blogging University. Enroll in one of our ten programs, and start your blog right.

You’re going to publish a post today. Don’t worry about how your blog looks. Don’t worry if you haven’t given it a name yet, or you’re feeling overwhelmed. Just click the “New Post” button, and tell us why you’re here.

Why do this?

  • Because it gives new readers context. What are you about? Why should they read your blog?
  • Because it will help you focus your own ideas about your blog and what you’d like to do with it.

The post can be short or long, a personal intro to your life or a bloggy mission statement, a manifesto for the future or a simple outline of your the types of things you hope to publish.

To help you get started, here are a few questions:

  • Why are you blogging publicly, rather than keeping a personal journal?
  • What topics do you think you’ll write about?
  • Who would you love to connect with via your blog?
  • If you blog successfully throughout the next year, what would you hope to have accomplished?

You’re not locked into any of this; one of the wonderful things about blogs is how they constantly evolve as we learn, grow, and interact with one another — but it’s good to know where and why you started, and articulating your goals may just give you a few other post ideas.

Can’t think how to get started? Just write the first thing that pops into your head. Anne Lamott, author of a book on writing we love, says that you need to give yourself permission to write a “crappy first draft”. Anne makes a great point — just start writing, and worry about editing it later.

When you’re ready to publish, give your post three to five tags that describe your blog’s focus — writing, photography, fiction, parenting, food, cars, movies, sports, whatever. These tags will help others who care about your topics find you in the Reader. Make sure one of the tags is “zerotohero,” so other new bloggers can find you, too.

Introduce Yourself (Example Post)

This is an example post, originally published as part of Blogging University. Enroll in one of our ten programs, and start your blog right.

You’re going to publish a post today. Don’t worry about how your blog looks. Don’t worry if you haven’t given it a name yet, or you’re feeling overwhelmed. Just click the “New Post” button, and tell us why you’re here.

Why do this?

  • Because it gives new readers context. What are you about? Why should they read your blog?
  • Because it will help you focus your own ideas about your blog and what you’d like to do with it.

The post can be short or long, a personal intro to your life or a bloggy mission statement, a manifesto for the future or a simple outline of your the types of things you hope to publish.

To help you get started, here are a few questions:

  • Why are you blogging publicly, rather than keeping a personal journal?
  • What topics do you think you’ll write about?
  • Who would you love to connect with via your blog?
  • If you blog successfully throughout the next year, what would you hope to have accomplished?

You’re not locked into any of this; one of the wonderful things about blogs is how they constantly evolve as we learn, grow, and interact with one another — but it’s good to know where and why you started, and articulating your goals may just give you a few other post ideas.

Can’t think how to get started? Just write the first thing that pops into your head. Anne Lamott, author of a book on writing we love, says that you need to give yourself permission to write a “crappy first draft”. Anne makes a great point — just start writing, and worry about editing it later.

When you’re ready to publish, give your post three to five tags that describe your blog’s focus — writing, photography, fiction, parenting, food, cars, movies, sports, whatever. These tags will help others who care about your topics find you in the Reader. Make sure one of the tags is “zerotohero,” so other new bloggers can find you, too.

Introduce Yourself (Example Post)

This is an example post, originally published as part of Blogging University. Enroll in one of our ten programs, and start your blog right.

You’re going to publish a post today. Don’t worry about how your blog looks. Don’t worry if you haven’t given it a name yet, or you’re feeling overwhelmed. Just click the “New Post” button, and tell us why you’re here.

Why do this?

  • Because it gives new readers context. What are you about? Why should they read your blog?
  • Because it will help you focus your own ideas about your blog and what you’d like to do with it.

The post can be short or long, a personal intro to your life or a bloggy mission statement, a manifesto for the future or a simple outline of your the types of things you hope to publish.

To help you get started, here are a few questions:

  • Why are you blogging publicly, rather than keeping a personal journal?
  • What topics do you think you’ll write about?
  • Who would you love to connect with via your blog?
  • If you blog successfully throughout the next year, what would you hope to have accomplished?

You’re not locked into any of this; one of the wonderful things about blogs is how they constantly evolve as we learn, grow, and interact with one another — but it’s good to know where and why you started, and articulating your goals may just give you a few other post ideas.

Can’t think how to get started? Just write the first thing that pops into your head. Anne Lamott, author of a book on writing we love, says that you need to give yourself permission to write a “crappy first draft”. Anne makes a great point — just start writing, and worry about editing it later.

When you’re ready to publish, give your post three to five tags that describe your blog’s focus — writing, photography, fiction, parenting, food, cars, movies, sports, whatever. These tags will help others who care about your topics find you in the Reader. Make sure one of the tags is “zerotohero,” so other new bloggers can find you, too.

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